pierogi5This can’t get any more traditional. Polish pierogi with meat, sauerkraut and dry wild mushrooms.
I also like the non meat version or the ones with potatoes and cheese and I can’t actually decide which are my favorites. Growing up, my mom would make those more often because she would always have some leftover meat from Sunday chicken soup, not to mention dried mushrooms that she hand picks every year in the fall, or home-made sauerkraut that she usually makes in a large jar starting early Fall.
They might seem time consuming, but once you make that one large batch, they freeze well and they taste pretty great fried, especially with some bacon.  If the amount of pierogi seems a little too much, then use half of the ingredients.  But it’s almost impossible to have too many pierogi. :) More »

ravioli

There are so many ways to fill ravioli that it’s hard to really pick my favorite. Since I love mushrooms and still have some Polish dry mushrooms from my mom in my pantry, I thought I would go for that. When it comes to Polish pierogi I am more of a traditionalist and like to stick to the fillings I ate growing up. So I see ravioli as a way to infuse ideas I would never use for pierogi :)
This time I also changed the dough recipe a little bit and instead of a mixture of olive oil and water I added only olive oil. The dough was super soft and elastic and so easy to knead. The only drawback was that if not covered by a kitchen towel it would dry out pretty fast and cause little cracks in the dough. But taste wise I think it was much better. It was rich and meaty, if you can say that about dough.
With this one I also wanted to make one larger ravioli with a poached egg inside as an extra surprise on your plate. When you cut through the poached egg it will add this amazing creaminess to the sauce. More »

ragout5

It looks like rabbit is quite a popular dish in many restaurants around Montreal, just like duck and venison. I had it in couple of places already and finally decided to make one. This meat is very lean and doesn’t need a lot of time to cook. My mom would usually use it in pate, which has always been something special in my family. When my dad used to go hunting, he would bring pheasants and hares we all knew there soon would be a pate on our table.
When cooking rabbit, you have to be very careful about timing because it’s very easy to overcook it, leaving the meat really dry. It’s nothing like pulled pork or stew when you can just leave it on the stove and forget about it for couple of hours. It’s a very hearty dish where the main star is the rabbit and sauce, not like a typical stew where you have a lot of veggies.
I strongly recommend making your own tagliatelle to serve with the ragout. More »